Can You Replace RV Toilet With Standard Toilet?

rv toilet

Possibly the biggest mystery to people who are thinking about living in an RV is how the toilets work. RV toilets are very different from the standard flush toilets that most of us have in our homes. So, can you put a regular toilet in a camper?

Today, we will demystify RV toilets and show you how they work. We’ll also look at the different types of RV toilets available on the market and help you decide which one is right for you.

Can You Put a Residential Toilet in an RV?

No, you cannot put a regular toilet in an RV. The two toilets are made for different situations. For example, your house stands still, so the trap on a home toilet can’t handle the amount of water flushed into it.

RV toilets have to be able to handle much more water since they are constantly moving. That means that the trap on an RV toilet is much bigger. If you tried to put a regular toilet in an RV, the water would slosh out of the bowl and onto the floor.

The other big difference between RV toilets and regular toilets is that RV toilets are designed to be used with less water. That’s because RV campers have to be very careful about their water usage. They can’t just let the water run and not worry about it as we do in our homes.

Why Can’t I Put a Residential Toilet in RV?

Now that we know that you can’t put a regular toilet in RV let’s see a few reasons why you can’t.

The first reason is that RV toilets are made for different situations. As we mentioned earlier, RV toilets are made to be used in a moving vehicle, while standard toilets are not. RV toilets are built to handle the movement of the RV and the bumps in the road. Standard toilets are not made for this and can break if used in an RV.

Another reason is that RV toilets don’t have a trap as standard toilets do. The trap is the toilet part that holds water in the bowl after you flush. That is what prevents sewer gas from coming back into the RV. RV toilets don’t have this because it can be difficult to keep the trap sealed when moving around.

Finally, RV toilets are made to be used with a small amount of water. Most RV toilets have a holding tank that holds around five or six gallons of water. That is enough water to flush the toilet but not enough to fill up the bowl like a standard toilet.

So, while you can technically put a regular toilet in an RV, it’s not made for that purpose, and it’s not going to work as well as an RV toilet.

Options for RV Toilets

Now that we know why you can’t put a regular toilet in an RV, let’s look at some available RV toilets. There are three main types of RV toilets: traditional gravity flush toilets, composting toilets, and portable camping toilets.

●     Traditional Gravity Flush Toilet

The traditional gravity flush toilet is the most common type of RV toilet. It works just like a regular toilet, except it uses less water. Most RV toilets use around 1.6 gallons of water per flush. That is enough water to get the job done without using too much of your precious RV resources.

Traditional gravity flush toilets are easy to use and maintain. However, they do require some level of upkeep, as you will need to empty the holding tank regularly. Gravity flush toilets can also be noisy when flushing, so keep this in mind if you are RVing with small children.

●     Composting Toilet

A composting toilet is a great option for those who want to be more environmentally friendly. These toilets don’t use any water at all. Instead, they rely on a process of decomposition to break down human waste.

Composting toilets can be a great option for RVers who want to minimize their impact on the environment. However, they do require some maintenance as you will need to empty the compost bin regularly. Composting toilets can also be smelly, so keep this in mind if you are RVing with small children.

●     Portable Camping Toilet

A portable camping toilet is a great option for RVers who want the convenience of a toilet without the hassle of emptying a holding tank. Portable toilets can be taken with you when you leave your RV to use them at any campsite.

Most portable toilets come with a waste bag that can be disposed of in a trashcan. Some models also have a flushable option, but this will use more water. Portable toilets are easy to use and maintain, but they can be expensive.

●     Cassette Toilet

A cassette toilet is a great option for RVers who want the convenience of a toilet without the hassle of emptying a holding tank. Cassette toilets are similar to portable toilets but installed in the RV. As a result, you don’t have to take them with you when you leave your RV.

Cassette toilets are easy to use and maintain, but they can be expensive. They also require some level of upkeep, as you will need to empty the cassette regularly.

Closing Thoughts

There are a variety of RV toilets on the market, so there is sure to be right for you. However, RV toilets are made to be used in a moving vehicle, so they are not the same as standard toilets.

RV toilets don’t have a trap as standard toilets do, and they are made to be used with a small amount of water. So while you can technically put a regular toilet in an RV, it’s not made for that purpose, and it’s not going to work as well as an RV toilet.

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