Winterization and RV Antifreeze

RV antifreeze

RV ownership has been on a rise for the last couple of years. Now, there are more RV owners among Americans than ever – with over a million of them living in their campers full-time. People who’ve ditched their homes RVs say that the lifestyle change made them happier and improved their lives.

Of course, you need to know how to maintain your new home if you want to live in it comfortably. That brings us to our today’s topic – RV antifreeze.

Maintaining Your RV During the Winter

If you’re one of these people – or even if you’re a simple RV owner – you need to know that living in RV might seem simpler than living in a home. And you’d be right. However, it still comes with certain challenges. Especially during the winter.

You see, unlike a home, an RV doesn’t have centralized heating. That means that you need to winterize it to make sure that the pipes don’t freeze and burst. And the best way to do that is by using RV antifreeze.

But what is RV antifreeze? Do you really need it? How much should you use? And what are the different types of RV antifreeze available on the market?

Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. In this article, we’ll answer all these questions and more. So, if you want to learn everything there is to know about RV antifreeze, make sure you stick around until the end.

What Is RV Antifreeze?

RV antifreeze is a solution that’s used to winterize RVs, campers, travel trailers, and other similar vehicles. It’s usually made of a propylene-glycol blend and it’s available in both concentrated and pre-mixed forms.

Concentrated RV antifreeze is usually pink or red and it needs to be diluted with water before use. On the other hand, pre-mixed RV antifreeze is ready to use and it’s usually green or blue.

Do I Need RV Winterizing Antifreeze?

The simple answer is – yes, you do need RV winterizing antifreeze if you want to protect your RV during the winter.

You see, when water freezes, it expands and that can cause serious damage to your RV’s plumbing system. And since most RVs are made of aluminum, the damage can be irreparable.

That’s why it’s important to use RV antifreeze in your water system. It will prevent the water from freezing and, as a result, protect your plumbing.

How Much RV Antifreeze Do I Need?

The amount of antifreeze you need depends on the size of your RV’s water system.

For example, if you have a 40-gallon freshwater tank, you’ll need around 5 gallons of RV antifreeze. But if your water tank is larger – say, 100 gallons – you’ll need 10-12 gallons of RV antifreeze.

It’s also important to note that you need to use a different amount of antifreeze for your gray and black water tanks. For example, if you have a 40-gallon gray water tank, you’ll need 3-4 gallons of RV antifreeze.

Types of Non-Toxic RV Antifreeze

Did you know that there are different types of RV antifreeze? And that not all of them are created equal? Then you need to read this section.

The most common type of RV antifreeze is ethanol-based antifreeze. It’s usually made of a blend of propylene glycol and ethylene glycol and it’s available in both concentrated and pre-mixed forms.

Ethanol-based antifreeze is effective and it’s the most popular choice among RV owners. However, it’s also the most toxic type of RV antifreeze. So, if you have pets or children, you might want to consider using a different type of antifreeze.

Propylene glycol-based antifreeze is another popular choice. It’s less toxic than ethanol-based antifreeze and it’s just as effective.

However, propylene glycol-based antifreeze can be more expensive than ethanol-based antifreeze. And it can also be harder to find.

The third and final type of RV antifreeze is propylene glycol-based antifreeze. It’s non-toxic, it’s effective, and it’s widely available.

However, propylene glycol-based antifreeze can be more expensive than ethanol-based antifreeze. So if you’re on a budget, you might want to consider using a different type of antifreeze.

How to Winterize Your RV

Now that you know everything there is to know about RV antifreeze, it’s time to learn how to winterize your RV. Here’s how to do it in five simple steps:

  • Step #1: Start by draining your freshwater tank. You can do this by opening all the faucets in your RV and letting the water run until it’s completely gone.
  • Step #2: Once your freshwater tank is empty, open the drain valves for your gray and black water tanks. Then, use a hose to flush out the tanks.
  • Step #3: Next, you need to add RV antifreeze to your water system. Start by adding it to your freshwater tank. Then, open all the faucets in your RV and let the antifreeze run through the system. Make sure you add enough antifreeze so that all the water in your system is replaced.
  • Step #4: Once you’ve added RV antifreeze to your system, it’s time to winterize your RV’s plumbing. The best way to do this is to use compressed air. Attach the air compressor to your RV’s city water connection and turn it on. Then, open all the faucets in your RV and let the airflow through the system.
  • Step #5: The last step is to winterize your RV’s hot water heater. To do this, you’ll need to turn off the power to the heater and open the drain valve. Then, let the water run out until it’s completely gone. Once that’s done, you can close the drain valve and turn the power back on.

The Bottom Line on RV Water System Antifreeze

Having the right type of antifreeze is an important part of winterizing your RV.

Remember, ethanol-based antifreeze is the most popular choice among RV owners but it’s also the most toxic. Propylene glycol-based antifreeze, on the other hand, is less toxic and just as effective. However, it can be more expensive than ethanol-based antifreeze.

The bottom line is that you need to use the right type of antifreeze for your RV. And you need to add the proper amount. That way, you can ensure that your RV is properly winterized and ready for the cold weather.

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